©2018 by the Missionary African Universal Church, Inc. Please note, the MAUC Inc. is not affiliated with any other African Universal Churches, or alike, at this time. All information disclosed cannot be re-produced with out authorization from the MAUC Inc. Please direct any inquiries to info@maucinc.org.

​​"​​ABANTU ABA NGA BANTU,  NGA BANTU ABA ZI ZLAYO NGE ZABO"

A PEOPLE WHO ARE A PEOPLE, ARE PEOPLE WHO PRIDE THEMSELVES IN THEIR OWN

Adorkaville - Celebrating 73 Years!

(What a Mighty God we serve!)

Adorkaville was founded by Reverend Dr. E. B. Nyombolo (Lil' Brother) in 1944 during the great housing shortage in the United States.  The site is located in Jacksonville, Florida U.S.A. and was  in a area not populated by many minorities during the initial decades. Lil' Brother founded the community in order to provide a place for deserving members to live while also dedicating its existence in Mother Kofi's honor; hence the name 'Adorkaville'. The community would also prepare African Americans who desired to return to Africa as well as develop relationships and businessmen in Africa and America.

Adorkaville is a church community which originally encompassed 14 members built homes which included the church and church​ mission (recreation) center. The land, homes and other various buildings were not financed by any government subsidies, but instead mostly by its founder and members​.  As membership expanded,  a larger church building called the 'O'Susi Temple' went under construction. Saint Susi was one of the African bodyguards and guides for Dr. David Livingstone of Scotland. Plans were also in p​lace for a new building , called the Ile Ife Institute, to function as an  office, university and dormitory (for visiting Africans as a "home away from home"). 

The community members were taught an African language (Bantu) and customs that were incorporated into their lifestyles. Their fluency in the Bantu language (also known as

Xhosa/Pondo/Zulu)enabled the community to become bi-lingual as they conversed, sang songs and held services utilizing the language. The community and organization were also involved in the import of crafts  and other goods from Africa and exported tools and equipment to Africa. Imports included items such as gingers, palm oil and precious stones while exports included hardware, haberdashery, farm implements and machinery. Some would describe the community as a mini African village.

 

Although the community was situated in what was known during that time (1940's-60's) as an area inhabited predominately by whites, the community has no known history of racial unrest; despite some unruly racial demonstrations in other surrounding communities.

 

The community is still intact today and fosters the same principles established when it was founded, despite persecution and hardship from evil forces. The active MAUC members are proud to be apart of a community and organization with such rich and unique history and look forward to future endeavors in peace.